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Samuel Cashwan

Samuel Cashwan was born December 26, 1900 in Cherkassi, Russia. Besides producing a number of WPA works in Michigan, Cashwan was the head of the WPA sculpture section in Michigan. Apparently Cshwan retired from Michigan to NC, where he died. His works include:

  • Aquarius” (1938-39)
    This 32-foot statue apparently was originally located at the Lansing Water Treatment Plant.It is now part of the MSU walking tour page.http://www.msu.edu/~kamuseum/exhibitions/online/walking/page8.html
  • Musicians
    At Michigan State University, the Music Building, is a cast-concrete sculpture by Samuel Cashwan depicting a group of musicians. It includes a bass player, a drummer, and a saxophonist - http://www.msu.edu/~kamuseum/exhibitions/online/walking/page4.html
  • Lincoln Memorial Statue
    This Cashwan work is located at the Lincoln Consolidated Training School, Ypsilanti, MI. There is a photo of the 13 foot Lincoln Memorial statue made of limestone, funded by the Federal Art Project and sponsored by the Lincoln Consolidated Training School, Ypsilanti, Michigan. The photo shows the artists from this project – Samuel Cashwan, Nelva Browning, Margaret Ann Lau, &Dorris Garrod. http://newdeal.feri.org/library/h56.htm
  • “Willoughby D. Miller” (1940)
    Located in front of the Kellogg-Dental School on the North University campus at the University of Michigan is a marble-like (probably limestone) sculpture entitled “Willoughby D. Miller”, a memorial of Dr. Miller (class of 1875) that was done by Samuel Adolph Cashwan in 1940 with partial WPA funding. According to a local source, the Miller monument is still in place but a bust that was on top of this work was deemed “weird” and subsequently moved inside the Dentistry school.

    http://www.plantext.bf.umich.edu/planner/sculpture/central/millmem.htm

  • Clare Middle School (formerly Clare High School) – an eight foot sculpture by Cashwan entitiled “Pioneer Mother” dedicated on November 11, 1938. (photos)

These photos of a Cashwan Snail pond that was in his backyard when he was growing up were contributed by Daniel Redstone, Michigan